Empathy, Ideation, Lenses, Tool, Understanding the Customer

You, Me, and Jon Snow: The Power of Knowing Nothing

Shaken, but emotionally under control, Bryan Mills (played by Liam Neeson) picks up the phone and talks to his daughter's captor. "I don't know who you are. I don't know what you want. If you are looking for ransom I can tell you I don't have money, but what I do have are a very… Continue reading You, Me, and Jon Snow: The Power of Knowing Nothing

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Empathy, Innovation, Understanding the Customer

Listening for Hidden Solutions

Every cloud has its silver lining. At least that's what were told, usually when things go bad. There has to be a nugget of hope somewhere. I can only imagine that thought ran through Jerry Sternin's mind when he visited Vietnam in 1990. As part of Save the Children, Sternin was there to help the… Continue reading Listening for Hidden Solutions

Being Awesome, Innovation, Lenses, Uncategorized, Understanding the Customer, User Experience, UX UI

Poetic UI UX Design

“I’ve got so many MBAs, but what I need is a poet. Poets are the original systems thinkers.” -Max DePree Poetry uses "condensed or compressed form to convey emotion or ideas to the reader's or listener's mind or ear" as defined by Poetry.org. Which felt like the perfect site to define poetry at. If we re-word… Continue reading Poetic UI UX Design

Being Awesome, Brainstorming, Diffusion of Innovation, Ideation, Innovation, Understanding the Customer

Innovating with the Uninterested

My kids send me strong signals all the time. For example, when we have broccoli or sweet potatoes, they respond with very strong signals. Unfortunately their signals are strong AND negative. One way we've tried limit these anti-veggie reactions is to get them involved in the meal planning. Like in meal planning, we should be looking for strong signals with prototype tests and sometimes the strongest signals come from the "Late Majority". See how you can turn their complaints into compliments.

Diffusion of Innovation, Going Forth, Grand Canyon, Innovation, Micro-Patterns, Persona, Understanding the Customer

Where did I leave that Grand Canyon?

Using averages is as good at preventing us from understanding our customer, as it would be at eliminating the Grand Canyon from a topographical map. Averages smooth out the peaks and valleys that our customers experience and obscure their true needs and usage from us.